Experience Persian Art and Architecture

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Dont just go to Persia...live Persia

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Experience Persian History and Culture

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Experience persian wildlife

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Experience Persian Art and Architecture

"Land of mysterious diversity"

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About Iran

nature

Nature of Mashhad

Major rivers: Atrak, 500 km long, is one of the longest rivers of Iran. It originates in mountains around Ghoochan, runs westwards, passes over a long distance and finally ends in the Caspian Sea. Its average width is 4 m, and its depth one m. The area of the…
nature

Nature of Shiraz

Major rivers: Kor river originates in the mountains of Eghlid, passes over Shiraz province, and finally pours into the Bakhtegan lake. Margan and Chobakhleh rivers are the tributaries of this river. The most important river of Mamassani, Fahliyan River,…
Attractions

Music

Most Iranians are familiar with the big names of Western pop, thanks to satellite TV and the internet. Almost every taxi driver, especially in Tehran, seems to keep a cache of Turkish pop classics stashed under the dashboard. Increasingly, shops selling CDs…
Attractions

Arts

From The moment, some 3000 years ago, when an ingenious artist shaped and painted the magnificent bridge-spouted vessels at Tepe Sialk … to the time when master craftsmen carved the famous Achaemenian relief’s at Persepolis … and on into the Islamic era when…

Yazd “the city of honey & culture”


With its winding lanes, forest of badgirs, mud-brick old town and charismatic accommodation, Yazd is one of the highlights of any trip to Iran. Wedged between the northern Dasht-e Kavir and southern Dasht-e Lut, it doesn’t have the big-ticket sights of Esfahan or Persepolis, but as a whole, and in the context of its relationship  with the desert, it is at least as enchanting. It is a place to wander and get lost in the maze of historic streets and lanes.



History


Yazd is said to be the ‘oldest living city on Earth’. This might be a difficult claim to verify, but it is widely believed the site has been continually inhabited for about 7000 years. Its position on important trading routes and a tendency towards diplomacy go some way to explaining Yazd’s longevity. The fact that commercial prosperity never really translated into real political power is probably another reason. When Marco Polo passed this way in the 13th century, he described Yazd as ‘a very fine and splendid city and a centre of commerce’. It was spared destruction by Genghis Khan and Tamerlane, and flourished in the 14th and 15th centuries, with silk, textile and carpet production the main home-grown industry. Like most of Iran, Yazd fell into decline when the Safavids were defeated and remained little more than a provincial outpost until the last shah extended the railway line to Yazd.