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Experience Persian History and Culture

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Experience persian wildlife

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Experience Persian Art and Architecture

"Land of mysterious diversity"

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About Iran

nature

Nature of Ardebil

Aras River, 1,072 km long, forms a natural border between Iran and the Republic of Azerbaijan. As Aras is very steep, it cannot be used for shipping. However, this river plays an important role in irrigation of surrounding lands and supplying power to the…
cities

Shush “essence of persia”

Shush (Susa) was once among the greatest cities of ancient Persia. Now it’s a pleas antly small, relatively new town with a vast archaeological site, splendid castle, enig matic Tomb of Daniel and bustling market. History An important Elamite city from about…
nature

Nature of East Azarbaijan

Aras River flows along the northern border of this province as a natural boundary between the province and the two republics to its north. This river provides the region with water, hydroelectric power and many opportunities for recreation. Aji-chai, also…
Facts

Dress code

Men Actually the way you dress up is not a big deal in Iran, you should know: Shorts are not acceptable in public places for menWearing ties or bows is not a problem & t-shirts are acceptable women obeying Islamic rules including hijab or Islamic dress-code…

Yazd “the city of honey & culture”


With its winding lanes, forest of badgirs, mud-brick old town and charismatic accommodation, Yazd is one of the highlights of any trip to Iran. Wedged between the northern Dasht-e Kavir and southern Dasht-e Lut, it doesn’t have the big-ticket sights of Esfahan or Persepolis, but as a whole, and in the context of its relationship  with the desert, it is at least as enchanting. It is a place to wander and get lost in the maze of historic streets and lanes.



History


Yazd is said to be the ‘oldest living city on Earth’. This might be a difficult claim to verify, but it is widely believed the site has been continually inhabited for about 7000 years. Its position on important trading routes and a tendency towards diplomacy go some way to explaining Yazd’s longevity. The fact that commercial prosperity never really translated into real political power is probably another reason. When Marco Polo passed this way in the 13th century, he described Yazd as ‘a very fine and splendid city and a centre of commerce’. It was spared destruction by Genghis Khan and Tamerlane, and flourished in the 14th and 15th centuries, with silk, textile and carpet production the main home-grown industry. Like most of Iran, Yazd fell into decline when the Safavids were defeated and remained little more than a provincial outpost until the last shah extended the railway line to Yazd.