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Experience Persian History and Culture

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Experience persian wildlife

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Experience Persian Art and Architecture

"Land of mysterious diversity"

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About Iran

Iran

Climate

Iran has 4 seasons. Temperatures can vary wildly: when it’s -5°C in Tabriz it might be 35°C in Bandar Abbas, but for most people spring and autumn are the most pleasant times to visit. At other times, the seasons have advantages and disadvantages depending on…
Iran

Geography

More than half of Iran is covered by mountains and in the vast majority of places there will be a peak of some size looming at the end of the street. Four ranges are most prominent. The smaller, volcanic Sabalan and Talesh Ranges in the northwestern Azeri…
Iran

The language

Historically there are three major periods of development within the Persian language: Old Persian, the language of the Achaemenians (650 – 350 B.C.); Middle Persian (the Parthian period c. 350 B.C. – 230 A.D. and, immediately following that, the Sassanian…
cities

Yazd “the city of honey & culture”

With its winding lanes, forest of badgirs, mud-brick old town and charismatic accommodation, Yazd is one of the highlights of any trip to Iran. Wedged between the northern Dasht-e Kavir and southern Dasht-e Lut, it doesn’t have the big-ticket sights of…

Shush “essence of persia”


Shush (Susa) was once among the greatest cities of ancient Persia. Now it’s a pleas antly small, relatively new town with a vast archaeological site, splendid castle, enig matic Tomb of Daniel and bustling market.



History


An important Elamite city from about the middle of the 3rd millennium BC, Susa was burnt around 640 BC by the Assyrian king Ashurbanipal, but regained prominence in 521 BC when Darius I set it up as the Achaemenids’ fortified winter capital. At that time it was probably similar in grandeur to Persepolis. The palace survived the city’s fall to Alexander the Great in 331 BC, and indeed Alex ander married one of Darius III’s daughters here. Still prosperous in the Seleucid and Parthian eras, Susa re-emerged as a Sassanian capital. During Shapur II’s reign (AD 310–379) it regained renown as a Jewish pil grimage site and became a centre of Nestorian Christian study. Evacuated in the face of Mongol raids Shush disappeared into the sands of time, only re-emerging after 1852 when the British archaeologist WK Loftus became the first to survey the site. His work was continued by the French Archaeological Service from 1891 more or less continuously until the Islamic Revolution of 1979.