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Experience Persian History and Culture

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Experience persian wildlife

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Experience Persian Art and Architecture

"Land of mysterious diversity"

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About Iran

nature

Nature of Gilan

Gilan province offers great tourist potentials and receives hundreds of visitors from different parts of Iran and the world, each year. Covering an area of 438,000 km2, the Caspian Sea is the largest lake of the world and lies on the north of Gilan province.…
Attractions

SPORT

Iran does have an interesting sporting history. Polo is believed to have originated in Iran and was certainly played during the reign of Darius the Great. A couple of millennia later, the huge main square of Esfahan was used for polo matches that would be…
Iran

The currency

The official unit of currency is the Iranian rial, but Iranians almost always talk in terms of tomans, a unit equal to 10 rials. The sooner you get your head around the idea of tomans, the better. However, with inflation soaring and the Central Bank of Iran…
nature

Nature of West Azerbaijan

Lake Urumieh, the largest inland water of the country, covers an area of about 5,000 km2, and lies in the west of the province. Because of the high salinity, plant and animal life is very limited in this lake. The Artemiasalina lobster is the only marine…

Shush “essence of persia”


Shush (Susa) was once among the greatest cities of ancient Persia. Now it’s a pleas antly small, relatively new town with a vast archaeological site, splendid castle, enig matic Tomb of Daniel and bustling market.



History


An important Elamite city from about the middle of the 3rd millennium BC, Susa was burnt around 640 BC by the Assyrian king Ashurbanipal, but regained prominence in 521 BC when Darius I set it up as the Achaemenids’ fortified winter capital. At that time it was probably similar in grandeur to Persepolis. The palace survived the city’s fall to Alexander the Great in 331 BC, and indeed Alex ander married one of Darius III’s daughters here. Still prosperous in the Seleucid and Parthian eras, Susa re-emerged as a Sassanian capital. During Shapur II’s reign (AD 310–379) it regained renown as a Jewish pil grimage site and became a centre of Nestorian Christian study. Evacuated in the face of Mongol raids Shush disappeared into the sands of time, only re-emerging after 1852 when the British archaeologist WK Loftus became the first to survey the site. His work was continued by the French Archaeological Service from 1891 more or less continuously until the Islamic Revolution of 1979.