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About Iran

Iran

Cinema

Irans love affair with cinema started at the dawn of the last century. Mirza Ebrahim Khan Akkas-Bashi recorded a royal visit to Belgium in 1900, and in the same year the countrys first public cinema opened in Tabriz. By 1904 a cinema had opened in Tehran, and…
cities

kashan “the city of antiquity”

Kashan and its surrounds have been home to human settlements since at least the 4th millennium BC. However, much of what is known of Kashan’s history is interwoven with legend. What is certain is that Kashan was twice destroyed by invading armies. The city…
cities

Hamadan “the city of stars and mountains”

Known in classical times as Ecbatana, Hamadan was once one of the ancient world’s greatest cities. significant parts of the city centre are given over to excavations and there is a scattering of historical curiosities. Sitting on a high plain, Hamadan is…
cities

Gorgan “the city of horses”

This appealing city has a colourful, ethnically mixed population and an attractive location where the green Alborz Mountains stoop to meet the northeastern steppe. The Turkoman tribes who inhabit the north of Gorgan are the largest tribe of Gorgan city.

Shush “essence of persia”


Shush (Susa) was once among the greatest cities of ancient Persia. Now it’s a pleas antly small, relatively new town with a vast archaeological site, splendid castle, enig matic Tomb of Daniel and bustling market.



History


An important Elamite city from about the middle of the 3rd millennium BC, Susa was burnt around 640 BC by the Assyrian king Ashurbanipal, but regained prominence in 521 BC when Darius I set it up as the Achaemenids’ fortified winter capital. At that time it was probably similar in grandeur to Persepolis. The palace survived the city’s fall to Alexander the Great in 331 BC, and indeed Alex ander married one of Darius III’s daughters here. Still prosperous in the Seleucid and Parthian eras, Susa re-emerged as a Sassanian capital. During Shapur II’s reign (AD 310–379) it regained renown as a Jewish pil grimage site and became a centre of Nestorian Christian study. Evacuated in the face of Mongol raids Shush disappeared into the sands of time, only re-emerging after 1852 when the British archaeologist WK Loftus became the first to survey the site. His work was continued by the French Archaeological Service from 1891 more or less continuously until the Islamic Revolution of 1979.