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About Iran

cities

kermanshah “the city of Dandeh Kebab”

By far the largest and busiest city in central west Iran, Kermanshah developed in the 4th century AD astride the Royal Road to Baghdad. Its strategic position has brought both prosperity and attack. Most recently it suffered missile damage during the…
Iran

The people

POPULATIONWhen Iranians meet they inevitably ask: ‘Where are you from?’ This is because Iran has a multiplicity of distinct ethnic identities who are all, nevertheless, Iranian. It is important to understand that though the indigenous ethnicities are very…
nature

Nature of Kish

The Persian Gulf and the Sea of Oman, whose coasts provide excellent opportunities for recreation in the cool seasons, lie to the south of this province. In winter, when most of the regions of Iran have cold weather and are covered in snow, the moderate…
Iran

Theater

The most important and prevalent form of Iranian theater is the Ta ziyeh(passion play), which means “mourning for the dead” , and actually predates the introduction of Islam into Iran. These plays are staged in every Iranian city, town and village during…

kashan “the city of antiquity”


Kashan and its surrounds have been home to human settlements since at least the 4th millennium BC. However, much of what is known of Kashan’s history is interwoven with legend. What is certain is that Kashan was twice destroyed by invading armies. The city walls were rebuilt, and during the Seljuk period (AD 1051–1220) it became famous for its textiles, pottery and tiles.
Shah Abbas I was so enamoured with this delightful oasis city on the edge of the Dasht-e Kavir that he insisted on being buried here rather than in Esfahan. Much of Kashan was destroyed by an earthquake in 1779 but the subsequent Qajar period saw building on a lavish scale. The most notable survivors are the fine covered bazaar and several meticulously restored mansions that have become synonymous with the city. The bazaar is deceptively large and has an enchantingly lethargic atmosphere that serves as the perfect counterfoil to the frantic bustle of Tehran and the sightseeing intensity of Esfahan.