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Experience Persian Art and Architecture

"Land of mysterious diversity"

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About Iran

Iran

Theater

The most important and prevalent form of Iranian theater is the Ta ziyeh(passion play), which means “mourning for the dead” , and actually predates the introduction of Islam into Iran. These plays are staged in every Iranian city, town and village during…
cities

Chabahar “the city of coastal water sports”

This province lies in the southeast of Iran on the border with Pakistan, and covers an area of 178,431km2. It is surrounded by the Sea of Oman to its south, Pakistan and Afghanistan to its east, the provinces of Kerman and Hormozgan to its west and Khorasan…
nature

Nature of West Azerbaijan

Lake Urumieh, the largest inland water of the country, covers an area of about 5,000 km2, and lies in the west of the province. Because of the high salinity, plant and animal life is very limited in this lake. The Artemiasalina lobster is the only marine…
nature

Nature of Hamedan

The largest river in this province, the Gamasiab, passes through the provinces of Kermanshah, Lorestan, 11am, and Khuzestan where it is known as Karkheh. The mineral water spring of Tangez provides gaseous water that contains bicarbonate of chlorine and is…

Isfahan “half of the world”


Esfahan is Iran’s masterpiece, the jewel of  ancient Persia and one of the finest cities in the Islamic world. The exquisite blue mosaic tiles of Esfahan’s Islamic buildings, its expansive bazaar and its gorgeous bridges demand as much of your time as you can spare. It is a city for walking, getting lost n the bazaar, dozing in beautiful gardens, and drinking tea and chatting to locals in the marvellous teahouses. More than anything else, though, Esfahan is a place for savouring the high refinements of Persian culture most evident in and around naqsh-e jahan Sq-the Imam Mosque, Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque, Ali Qapu Palace and Chehel Sotun Palace.



History


Little is known of Esfahan’s ancient history, but the Ateshkadeh-ye Esfahan and pillars of the Shahrestan Bridge, both from the Sassanid period, attest to its longevity. The Buyid period saw an explosion of construction and by the late 10th century the walled city of Esfahan was home to dozens of mosques and hundreds of wealthy homes. In 1047 the Seljuks made Esfahan their capital and during the next 180 years it was adorned with the magnificently geometric Seljuk style of architecture, several prominent parts of which remain. The Mongols put an end to that, and it wasn’t until the glorious reign of the Safavid Shah Abbas I (also revered as Shah Abbas the Great), which began in 1587, that Esfahan was again Iran’s premier city. After moving the capital from Qazvin to Esfahan, Abbas set about transforming it into a city worthy of an empire at its peak. His legacy is the incomparable naqsh-e-jahan Sq and artistic advances particularly in carpet weaving that were celebrated and envied as far away as Europe. Subsequent Safavid rulers also contributed to Esfahan’s skyline, but little more than a century after Abbas’ death the dynasty was finished and the capital transferred first to Shiraz and later Tehran.